August IWSG: Writer's Block

7:00 AM Elizabeth Seckman 27 Comments

Join the IWSG!
This month's insecurity issue is brought to you by the lovely Chrys Fey and her new book, Keep Writing with Fey.  The challenge during this blog hop is to finally, once and for all, face writer burnout, block, and depression.

I can 100% say that any and every time I have felt like NOT writing it stems from insecurity. Nothing kills the creative spirit like questioning your worth as a writer. That shadowy doubt shades everything until you don't even want to touch a keyboard (or a pen, depending on how you're writing) ever again. It feels like a huge waste of time and energy.

How do I deal with it? I remind myself why it is that I started writing in the first place. I didn't start writing my first story because I thought it would be an easy way to make money. Or get famous. Honestly, I started my first story without any intention of ever sharing it with anyone.

I wrote it for me.

I wrote it because I love to make sh*t up. The only reason my writing was ever "discovered" was because I lost the file I was working on and had to call my dad (a tech wizard) to help me recover it. He found it, read it, and shared it with my mother who was absolutely relentless in her support.

No one could nag and badger better than my mother. I started sending out manuscripts just to keep her off my back. To be completely honest, when I sent out that first story, I was terrified. And it wasn't because I feared it would be rejected. No, I fully expected and was ready to deal with rejection. I was afraid the it would succeed. My biggest fear was that writing would become a business and I'd grow to hate it. Make-believe is my happy place. I never want to be blocked out of it.

So, when the words won't come, I quit trying to be an author and I go back to writing stories.


August 5 question - Quote: "Although I have written a short story collection, the form found me and not the other way around. Don't write short stories, novels or poems. Just write your truth and your stories will mold into the shapes they need to be."
Have you ever written a piece that became a form, or even a genre, you hadn't planned on writing in? Or do you choose a form/genre in advance?

Everything I write, without exception, in some ways turns into a love story. I'm an unapologetic happily-ever-after junkie. So, I guess the answer is no. As of yet, I have never surprised myself. 


The awesome co-hosts for the August 5 posting of the IWSG are Susan Baury Rouchard, Nancy Gideon, Jennifer Lane, Jennifer Hawes, Chemist Ken, and Chrys Fey!


Keep Writing with Fey Blog Hop: Share your story about writer's block, depression, and/or burnout and how you overcame it or what you are currently doing to heal.





Catch the sparks you need to conquer writer’s block, depression, and burnout!

When Chrys Fey shared her story about depression and burnout, it struck a chord with other writers. That put into perspective for her how desperate writers are to hear they aren’t alone. Many creative types experience these challenges, battling to recover. Let Keep Writing with Fey: Sparks to Defeat Writer's Block, Depression, and Burnout guide you through:

·        Writer's block
·        Depression
·        Writer's burnout
·        What a writer doesn’t need to succeed
·        Finding creativity boosts

With these sparks, you can begin your journey of rediscovering your creativity and get back to what you love - writing.


BOOK LINKS:

Amazon / Nook / iTunes / Kobo





ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Chrys Fey is the author of Write with Fey: 10 Sparks to Guide You from Idea to Publication. She is also the author of the Disaster Crimes series. Visit her blog, Write with Fey, for more tips on how to reverse writer’s burnout. https://www.chrysfey.com/

27 comments:

  1. I think that's the best way to get started out...writing the book of your heart. And insecurity is such a tough issue for so many writers--it's great that you've written a resource to help others with it!

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    1. I think insecurity is the root of every block. Even for people who have written best sellers. There is the still the fear the next book will fall short. All of the prolific writers I know seem to be able to put those worries out of their heads.

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  2. We have to write for ourselves or we lose that joy.

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    1. And where there is no joy, there is only work and no one likes to go to work.

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  3. Fear of success is just as real as fear of failure. It forces out of our comfort zone.

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    1. Success raises the stakes. You have more scrutiny and it's farther to fall on the next books.

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  4. You should never question your worth as a writer, whenever I have done that my writing has gone for a toss. I now ensure that the the doubts and negative feelings don't affect me.

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  5. You've been true to yourself, that's important. Happy Birthday, Elizabeth!

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  6. I really like writing for me! Thinking of the responsibilities of being an author sometimes make me uninspired.

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  7. When I first started writing, I wrote for me, too. But then I started writing to publish, and after some time that really impacted me in a bad way. I've gotten back to writing for myself and the fun of it (it took some time and retraining/rewriting), and that has helped a lot.

    Thank you so much for participating in my blog hop!

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  8. I can 100% relate with being afraid of succeeding and having something you love end up a chore as a result.

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  9. It's so wonderful that your parents encouraged you that way. I can identify with being afraid of success. Dealing with publishing, marketing, and promotion to an introvert can be so overwhelming. Writing alone? Not so much.

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  10. I think writing for ourselves first is the key to being happy writers. I'm glad you write those happy endings. We need those. And, we need love. I can't seem to write romance well - unless I want to make my cat laugh, but I appreciate that you do.

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  11. Making sh*t up is the best ever reason to write!

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  12. I like to hold onto these words whenever I submit a story: the worst they can say is yes...

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  13. That's why I started writing, too - for me. Because I love the stories in my head. Sometimes I get bogged down with the business of being a writer, and then it's not so much fun anymore. I have to go back to the beginning and start writing for me again.
    Lori at https://lorilmaclaughlin.com

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  14. Thanks Elizabeth for sharing Chrys’ Fey blog-hop.
    Happy IWSG writing.

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  15. Happy Belated Birthday! (Sorry, I saw it pop up on facebook but I'm terrible at using social media for what it's meant for.) You have a great attitude toward writing. It's awesome. :)

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  16. You are an amazing author, Miss Elizabeth. I love your stories.
    Chrys, I trust your book is flying off the cyber shelf.

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  17. Yep, we have to write for ourselves or the fun goes and then it just becomes a slog.

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  18. Good answer. I can't keep away from happily ever after either.

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  19. I just got Chrys' writing book--hoping for a bit of unique inspiration. I can't wait to get started.

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  20. Thanks for sharing. I agree that insecurity can be a creative killer. I too like being able to write just because I like it, but so many people seem to miss that point. Too many people add the pressure of making money to writing. I would never turn down money for my writing, but I also wouldn't stop writing because there's little to no money in it.

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  21. Hi Elizabeth...

    I LOVE that you still love "Happily ever after" love stories. It is romantic in you. My favorite guilty splurge are Christmas ROM/COMS...Ssssh... don't tell anyone. LOL

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  22. I find when I’m honest, I’m a better writer.

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  23. Insecurity is definitely the demon isn't it? We'd get so much more done and done so much better without it.
    That said, I'm anxious to read a book set in the 50s. Wink. Wink.

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  24. I'm having that issue and need to re-learn how to write for me and ignore all the other voices...well, until edit time comes.
    Nothing better than happy-ever-afters!

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