English Answers and Irish Mysteries!

12:00 AM Elizabeth Seckman 30 Comments

Join the challenge HERE!

                                         






Next up for the challenge is my e-twinny's post. Leave it to Mark Koopmans to flip the "It was 1865..." prompt and turn it into a delightful contemporary mystery. Well done cyber brother, well done. 






                                                         ************

And last week, Kyra Lennon was here to stump us Yankees to a slang challenge. She's back this week with the answers!

First, I'll refresh your memory on the slang...let you see the attempts at deciphering Here.

Slang quiz:
“Have a butcher’s”
“Starkers”
“Knees Up”
“Tickety Boo”
“I’ll give you a bell”
“Cheerio”
“Rat-arsed” (if you’ve read Game On, you’ll know this one!)
“Skew-whiff”
“Chuffed”
“Rumpy pumpy”
Good luck, and have fun!

Now, for the official answers!!

“Have a butcher’s” – This means “Have a look”. This is Cockney rhyming slang, which makes absolutely no sense to anyone outside the UK because the word that rhymes is missing lol. Butcher’s hook = look.
“Starkers” - Naked
“Knees Up” – This isn’t as rude as it sounds! A knees up is a term we use for a party or other celebration. So, IF England had won the World Cup, we’d have probably gone out for a “knees up” to celebrate!
“Tickety Boo” – Not sure on the origin of this one, but it means “fine.” As in, “Hey, how are things with you?” “Oh, everything’s tickety boo!”
“I’ll give you a bell” – This means, “I’ll call you.”
“Cheerio” – “Goodbye”
“Rat-arsed” (if you’ve read Game On, you’ll know this one!) – Drunk – no idea on the origins of this one, either!
“Skew-whiff” – The obvious word I could think of to explain this is also British in nature, and my end-of-the-day brain told me to go to urban dictionary for a proper description. - turned or twisted toward one side.
“Chuffed” – Happy, pleased
“Rumpy pumpy” – Sex!


Thanks so much to everyone who joined in the fun – I had a great time looking at all the entries! My winner is: Kristin Smith! 

Congratulations Kristin!! Perhaps next time, we should try to stump the Brits!

30 comments:

  1. Thanks so much for playing the game! <3

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was fun. I say this fall, we Americans should put you guys to the slang challenge!

      Delete
  2. Cheers, Twinny, for the shout out and I'm so glad you liked my post...I swear the idea popped into my head and I was like..... "Oh, that sounds like fun!"

    We writers are a bit strange, aren't we :)

    Joy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are the strangest! But at least with all the voices in our head, writers are rarely bored and never alone.

      You did a great job. Loved the spin you took on the prompt!

      Delete
  3. Hi Elizabeth,

    Ah yes, I noticed Mazza's rebellious post. "Mazza" is British slang for "Mark."

    And there you go in regards to Kyra's British slang which may of fooled your Canadian neighbours. Of course, I know them well and I shall um "toss" in one myself, even though I'm "knackered."

    Must go now down my "apples and pears."

    Cheerio and see ya later, duck.

    Gary :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh no, he's speaking the King's! You'll need to Americanize, Canadanize that please :)

      LOL. I'll let Mazza know.

      Delete
    2. Apples and pairs means "stairs."

      Trouble and strife, as another example, means "wife." :)

      Delete
  4. Mark's entry was funny.
    Not sure how my wife would feel about the term rumpy pumpy.

    ReplyDelete
  5. haha I was right with most, now I'll just go bugger off

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was a little off, though righter than I'd than I thought!

      Delete
  6. Both Gary and I could have added hundreds more of course. Plus Gary is using some Cockney rhyming slang. Have a cup of rosie Gary Rosie Lee, cup of tea..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Makes makes me think of ring around the rosie, pocket full of posies. Cockney sounds like it'd be a lot of fun!

      Delete
  7. Congrats to the winner.That would not have been me because I about one answer. I do know a bit Cockey rhyming slang, though. My favorite is "Brahms and List."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have to admit my ignorance. Until this quiz, I didn't know anything about Cockney slang. I'll have to check it out. It sounds fun.

      Delete
  8. Yay to the winner. I would have thought "have a butcher's" had to do with eating a steak or something...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stephanie, this is rhyming slang. Have a butcher's hook, take a look.

      Delete
    2. I figured it would mean to take a whack at something. Nope, I never guessed having a look.

      Delete
  9. Chummy on Call the Midwife often says tickety boo. I can't remember if the other characters say it. When I watched the most recent season I started saying tickety boo, especially to the dogs who seemed to like the sound. Thanks for the interpretations.

    Love,
    Janie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I might start saying them too. People will think we are international types ;}

      Delete
  10. And now I look forward to adding all of this to my regular vocabulary. Ey missus, time to get starkers and do the ol' rumpy pumpy to get me chuffed!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree...not on the rumpy pumpy, but on the adding the slang to our daily lives. We can be classy trashy.

      Delete
  11. I'm still giggling about rumpy pumpy... LOL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was rather surprised I was so close to being right on that one.

      Delete
  12. Hey Elizabeth, thanks for visiting my blog and leaving a comment.
    Rick, your latest follower.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Rick! It was an enjoyable visit :)

      Delete
  13. Most are pretty obvious, like rumpy-pumpy. But I never would have guessed the "have a butcher's" or "Knees up.": Never in a million years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me neither! And honestly, I was fooled by rumpy pumpy too. I guess I went with the oh, that's too obvious route to guessing.

      Delete
  14. In Australia we use quite a few of those, but some I had never heard of. ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You guys must be closer to the crown than we are. I had only heard of a few, never really hear any of them used.

      Delete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...