Life as a Tree: April IWSG

6:15 AM Elizabeth Seckman 29 Comments


What does a tiny tree have to do with writer insecurity? Maybe nothing. 

This little maple planted itself in an idle flower pot and spent the summer growing into a for-real-looking tree. It certainly wasn't as big as the huge tree that most likely spawned it, but it was obviously a tree and seemed to be perfectly content in its miniscule piece of the planet.  
Come fall, its leaves turned and fell leaving nothing but a barren stick in a pot of dirt. Its survival was questionable. Outside, its roots might freeze. Inside, it might might not hibernate properly. 
But here it is again this spring. Buds at the top, a new leaf at the base. Odds were against it, but here it is: still a tree.  Probably doesn't have the proper sense to question its legitimacy as a tree.  

April 7 question - Are you a risk-taker when writing? Do you try something radically different in style/POV/etc. or add controversial topics to your work? Nope. I'm not out to intentionally ruffle feathers or break any molds. I'm a bit like the little tree, content in the pot God planted me in. Sometimes I lose my sap and hibernate for a bit, but then the sun warms and I'm out doing my growing thing. 


Thanks to this month's awesome co-hosts! PK Hrezo, Pat Garcia, SE White, Lisa Buie Collard, and Diane Burton!


29 comments:

  1. Your little tree is tough.
    Not a controversial risk taker either!

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  2. Love your analogy to a tree. I'm not a risk taker either, though I agree with people who say that writing and sharing it with others is being a risk taker.

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    1. That is a good point. We are sharing a bit of ourselves with the world.

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  3. Those volunteer maples are fierce!

    I never take risks with my writing. :)

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    1. They are. After my neighbor moved, maples were growing out of her gutter spouts. If humans weren't around, this area would probably be all maples.

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  4. Love the tree analogy! I'm not a risk taker when it comes to my writing. I don't think you can get any less controversial than cozy mysteries :)

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    1. Thank you!

      I don't know, your Mollie gets herself into some controversies!

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  5. Trees are tough and there's nothing wrong with being like a tree. =)

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  6. I love your little Maple! Nature has a lot to teach us about life, I think.
    I never write with the intent to stir controversy. Too exhausting and negative for my world.

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    1. If nature has taught me one thing, it's that it's quick to adapt and will happily wipe us out if we become too much of a problem.

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  7. Even trees take risks! I love your stories and feel you do take risks, even if they aren't "big" or controversial. You put your words out there. That in itself is a risk!

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    1. You are right on both counts, Lisa! Those little trees keep trying year after year to grow wherever and however they can.

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  8. Aw, love your analogy, Elizabeth! Hubby and I were just talking this morning how fascinating nature is--that it keeps doing what it's supposed to do despite the fact we help or hinder. That's God's design. So brilliant! I think risks come in all sizes--they don't have to be highly controversial to be a risk. Great to see you!!

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    1. I agree with you heartily and will offer an Amen! Nature is amazing. In my mind, there is no way it accidental. Humans could never create anything so adaptable and magnificent.

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  9. New slogan: Be the tree! I loved that story.

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    1. And there are so many different kinds of trees, so there is surely one that perfectly matches our personalities.

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  10. I gut-loaded my older drafts with over the top controversial content merely for shock value, goading my imagined future censors. Now that I'm an adult and my brain is fully developed, I've significantly toned it down.

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    1. Excellent point. In my youth, I also looked for excitement. Then I got older and as life handed me real-life tragedies, I realized a peaceful existence is worth its weight in gold

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  11. Yay for the little tree. Keep on growing!

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    1. He is. Little leaves are unfurling and new buds are popping out.

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  12. Look at your precious little tree! We have two pecan trees, now on their third year, and they are 2-foot tall sticks with tiny buds on them. They will be full trees one day!

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    1. I love to garden. It amazes me how a seed becomes a tree, or a flower, or a fruit. My tree is ahead of all the others, him being domesticated and all now.

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  13. Growing like the tree and being content sure is the way to be.

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  14. We had such an unexpected tree grow in a pot once in long ago Los Angeles. I watered it faithfully. At that time, we had no yard. It flourished and grew, nearly reaching the ceiling. Then, one day, I heard a crash. My little beloved tree fell over. I had to let it go. May your tree find its forever home outside . . . when it's a little bigger.

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  15. Your post is so well written, Elizabeth. I haven't seen you in a long time and don't know if it's because you haven't been here or if I've somehow missed your posts.

    Love,
    Janie

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  16. I'm just like you, Elizabeth! I don't want to ruffle anyone's feathers either. I'm open to trying things a little differently, to try and entertain and make people laugh, but that's as far as I will go! I love the little maple tree (you could call me a bit of a tree hugger lol), and it's so wonderful that it lived through the winter!
    Hugs
    Suzy xx

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